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industrialrednek
Nervous Wreck (II) Inmate

From:
Insane since: Feb 2003

posted posted 02-24-2003 22:46

Hey,
I recently was screwing around in photoshop and came up with this cool picture that someone wants to use as a logo. Now I've created logos in the past in Illustrator, however nothing that was ever this detail oriented. It has lots of rust and cracks and such in it. Can Anyone give me any advice on what to do to bring it in to illustrator and recreate it so it still looks as visually stunning?
i.r.

jstuartj
Bipolar (III) Inmate

From: Mpls, MN
Insane since: Dec 2000

posted posted 02-25-2003 00:28

It might help if we could see what it looks like. If it is too complex you might just be getter off keeping it raster, perhap at a higher the normal resolution to keep the edges from pixelating on output.

You also might combining vector and raster elements. Keeping the overall outlines and important details vector, and the shading, cracks and rust textures rasterized. That way the outline will stay clean and crisp as any size, that way you only have to worry about the textures pixelating which generally can be pushed farther.




The outline is vector but the inside texture is masked by the vector elements.

J. Stuart J.



[This message has been edited by jstuartj (edited 02-25-2003).]

Eggles
Nervous Wreck (II) Inmate

From: Melbourne, Australia
Insane since: Dec 2001

posted posted 02-26-2003 12:09

Hate to be a party pooper, but it is not a good idea having a logo with lots of texture and fine details. What will it look like on a faxed sheet? Of course, if the logo is to be confined to just web pages, that's OK, but one day they might actually want to use it in print.

DarkGarden
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: in media rea
Insane since: Jul 2000

posted posted 02-26-2003 16:22

Sounds like you might mean a treatment, not a logo.


Nonetheless, I'll give the benefit of the doubt: Why don't you let us SEE what you have, so that we can determine the best course to head down. If it's just a question of complex curves and lines, then we'll guide you into illustrator. If it's a question of textures, gradients ad nauseum, etc. then we'll probably suggest a simpler logo and the use of treatments through raster programs.


Logos are logos because they are simple, brandable, and can be used at multiple resolutions without visual loss. If that's not happening, then you're either looking at a treatment for a logo for a specific purpose, or something that's just a cute header graphic.

Dig?





industrialrednek
Nervous Wreck (II) Inmate

From:
Insane since: Feb 2003

posted posted 02-27-2003 08:41

Ok here's the logo. It's for a band



They want the logo but they want it all corroded looking.

i.r.




[This message has been edited by industrialrednek (edited 02-27-2003).]

Rinswind 2th
Maniac (V) Inmate

From: Den Haag: The Royal Residence
Insane since: Jul 2000

posted posted 02-27-2003 20:22

Ok here is some idea:
you did the corrosion effect with the colors try it to do with the form and the colors. Like the round holes on the to cogweels make them wornout (less round) with scratches and litte pices broken out. Then you can use the same logo in print and for web. On the otherhand i do see a lot off full-color detailed logos on print the latest time... so you might just keep in in PS. If i had to trtansform the logo i would select it form the layers fill it with a basic color and copy those simplified layers to illustrator. Not shure if Illustrator can handle layers...but oyu might no this better than i do.
Maybe when you flatten the psd to one layer you could use it as a sort off texture. sorry to be so unhelpfull

"Freedom of speech is by no means freedom to insult others" from the Razorart goodbye letter.

DarkGarden
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: in media rea
Insane since: Jul 2000

posted posted 02-27-2003 21:14

Do you know why logos are wonderful?

Because they can accept many many treatments for whatever mood you wish, message, communicative idea...and they still hold the same brand.

The thing is, what you posted was a logo...with a treatment. The shape and design is the base, the rusted metal is just to put across a specific feel. It's an effect. Dig?

At times you'll want to change thaty effect, to update it...but the shape remains the same. You might edit the logo itself at some point, but chances are you'll stick to changing the treatments.

So, taking what you have, I'd import it into Illustrator, look at the main shapes, and separate it into three:
Base cog Layer
Cutout Layer
Shadow Layer

Trace those out, and you should come up with something resembling (but much cleaner than) this.



Once that's done, you'll be able to work on your treatments in Photoshop with ease.



Or the shiny BMW feel.



Save the texturing for PhotoShop. It fits in for working AFTER you have the solid base.

Hope it helps.

Peter



industrialrednek
Nervous Wreck (II) Inmate

From:
Insane since: Feb 2003

posted posted 02-28-2003 00:46

Ok I'm definitely there with you Garden and agree, but here's where I'm sort of in limbo.

How can you ensure that the treatment will looks good when you go to print?

Now they want this logo with the corrosion for hats and shirts. Now shirts I'm fine because they can produce it off the initial image in high resolution. Now where we/I will run into a problem is for hats and other things where size is of importance. What can I do when someone needs it super sized with the treatment like that for print for say a poster? Or when they need to make it tiny for an embroidered hat? This is where I'm unsure.

DarkGarden
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: in media rea
Insane since: Jul 2000

posted posted 02-28-2003 02:10

That's the minor problem you run into. You'll need to assure that the versions you want for print are sized appropriately as Raster graphics when you're ready to go.

Creating your file size with a high resolution is the start. Creating at 300 dpi (as a rough) and the physical measurements you need is a good way to start. For smaller pieces, shrink your original, sharpen, tighten it up with minor touchups, and then you're good to go. Prepping raster work for print is a touch tougher than vectors that resize, but it's nowhere near impossible.

Keeping your logo base as a vector is just a good idea though for when you need to make those treaments that everyone seems to want.



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