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butcher
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: New Jersey, USA
Insane since: Oct 2000

posted posted 05-08-2001 23:57

The tingling in my bones tells me the answer to this may be painfully obvious, but I've brainlocked and therefore have to ask it.

I have a database I built on my local machine. I want to transfer the whole thing to a remote host. How do I do this?

Thanks

linear
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: other places
Insane since: Mar 2001

posted posted 05-09-2001 00:04

You want phpMyAdmin, if you don't already have it.

You'll have to move a table at a time, as far as I know. This tool gives you a one click way to dump a table into a flat SQL file that recreates the table.

You probably could do it using just the cammond line, but phpMyAdmin is *so* spiffy. You'll wonder how you lived without it.

bitdamaged
Maniac (V) Mad Scientist

From: 100101010011 <-- right about here
Insane since: Mar 2000

posted posted 05-09-2001 00:45

First yah linear is right phpMyAdmin is the way to go, it will dump the db for you on one end and you can use it to import on the other

Then I just found this article today (Umm I haven't read it but it looks like exactly what you need).




Walking the Earth like Kane

butcher
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: New Jersey, USA
Insane since: Oct 2000

posted posted 05-09-2001 01:23

Thanks guys,

Linear

I have phpMyAdmin installed on the remote site, but not on my own PC yet. I've was told I should learn MySQL from the comman line, so I'm still trying to do it that way.

Bitdamaged

You were right, that article describes exactly what I wanted. Although I don't have the time to read the whole thing right now, from what I have read, it looks excellent, and is duly bookmarked. I still want to try it.

I think my problem kind of still remains though. The database on my local machine, is not on the internet, so I don't think I can connect to it like the article says. I think I will have to do the flat file thing as Linear suggests.

I'm sure I'll be back to ask more questions as I get further along.

Thanks for the help!

BTW Linear, How's the baby doing?

linear
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: other places
Insane since: Mar 2001

posted posted 05-09-2001 05:30

Butcher: baby is thriving, thanks for asking.

I use phpMyAdmin almost every day. I may have used the mysql client from the command line twice all told. But then again I had to set up a development environment for several programmers. Each has his/her own tablespace and userID in MySQL, with authority to do anything at all within that tablespace. Plus each has his/her own Apache virtual host, with corresponding shell account and login ID. And for bonus points, each has his own phpMyAdmin instance set up so it sees only the right tablespace. So phpMyAdmin saves me hours. I love that I can run it from any machine at all (we password protect it).

butcher
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: New Jersey, USA
Insane since: Oct 2000

posted posted 05-09-2001 15:14

Glad to hear the baby's doing well Linear.

I actually did listen to the readme file and password protect the phpMyAdmin that I put on the remote.

I was just wondering, I run into mentions of Shell Account or From the Shell all the time. Could someone point me to a link, or give me a quick education on what the hell that is. Oh yea... can it be used on a windows machine?

Thanks

linear
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: other places
Insane since: Mar 2001

posted posted 05-09-2001 15:52

One of the most powerful and sometimes least appreciated features of Unix-like operating systems is the shell. The shell is to Unix what the DOS prompt is to Windoze, but there are rich programming features that command.com doesn't even come close to offering. You may consider that you're interacting directly with the OS when you use a DOS prompt, but you're actually using a sort of shell.

There are a number of different shells, actually, and choosing one is a matter of user preference. Almost all of the modern shells offer filename completion, command history (like Doskey), command line editing, full looping/branching, and job control. Changing shells is very simple, because they are commands like any other.

Your shell reads several files on startup, allowing you to customize your environment. You can set up aliases that make lengthy commands easier to access, set environment variables that influence the settings of other programs you run, fully customize your prompt, run programs at login/logout, and so on.

The "Unix way" involves using small programs that do single things, and chaining them together with the shell using input/output redirection and pipelining (these exist in a crude form under DOS). So If I want to know the top 25 largest mail spools on my mail server, I use a shell command like

ls -s /var/mail

butcher
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: New Jersey, USA
Insane since: Oct 2000

posted posted 05-09-2001 15:56

Am I thinking correctly that I would be able to use something like that if I have a version of Linux on my machine?

linear
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: other places
Insane since: Mar 2001

posted posted 05-09-2001 17:29

That is correct. You would be using bash by default under most Linux distributions.

Filename completion is so cool. You just type enough characters to distinguish the file from the others, then hit the tab key and the shell completes the filename for you.

Filename globbing (wildcards under DOS) is also tremendously more powerful. foo*.* on DOS doesn't do what it should, but in the shell it does. Regular expression-like character classes are available also.

You really miss that stuff when it's not there.

butcher
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: New Jersey, USA
Insane since: Oct 2000

posted posted 05-09-2001 18:11

Great! I think as soon as I can get out and buy a program to partition my hard drive, I'm going to get a Ver. of Linux to put on it. There's lots of things I've read for Linux that I'd like to try, i.e., compiling Apache, PHP, ect.. Things I'd like to know.

Does anybody have any programs they can recommend for hard drive partitioning. I've never done it before.

Also, I don't know if I've mentioned it here in the Asylum before but

MOWING THE LAWN SUCKS!

Thanks

bitdamaged
Maniac (V) Mad Scientist

From: 100101010011 <-- right about here
Insane since: Mar 2000

posted posted 05-09-2001 18:49

I've used partition magic before. It's good because it allows you to partition with existing data.

If you don't care or want to format your drive any way you can use fdisk which comes with. Or even most Linux distros have a partitioning app in the setup (but again most of these will destroy data

Oh yeah. Install windows. first
If you are picking a distro I recommend Mandrake easiest install I've found (and does everything redhat does)


Walking the Earth like Kane

linear
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: other places
Insane since: Mar 2001

posted posted 05-09-2001 19:09

presizer works great, is free and fits on one of those 98 boot floppies with the cab files and everything. I've used partition magic before, and I give presizer three thumbs up.

butcher
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: New Jersey, USA
Insane since: Oct 2000

posted posted 05-09-2001 19:21

Your right Bitdamaged, I don't want to reformat. I assume if your pointing out that Partition Magic can do it without destroying data, that some of the apps out there can't. Thanks for pointing that out, I'll know what to watch out for. Thanks for the Mandrake link also.

Linear
Thanks for the link, but I'm not sure if I can use that. If I'm understanding the FAQ's on that site properly, it doesn't create partitions, only resize's them. As far as I know (and I could be completely wrong) I don't have any partitions on my drive.

Thanks

linear
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: other places
Insane since: Mar 2001

posted posted 05-09-2001 19:35

creating partitions is a function of the fdisk that comes with your OS. Linux has about three flavors of fdisk. Partition Magic will create them, but costs $70, and won't fit on a floppy (they did that on purpose--too many people were copying it freely).

Right now you probably have a Primary, bootable partition formatted under the FAT32 filesystem. You will 1) defrag that partition first, for good hygeine, 2) run presizer to shrink the partition, reclaiming disk space and maintaining your data, 3) use fdisk diring the install process to create a Linux partition and filesystem in the free space on your drive.

Linux comes with a boot manager utility, LILO that will let you select which OS to boot. Like bd said, install windoze first, because it will overwrite the master boot record and LILO. (Typical arrogance, assuming you're the only OS on a drive. )

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