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zavaboy
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: f(x)
Insane since: Jun 2004

IP logged posted posted 07-24-2009 01:29 Edit Quote

I'm very interested in jumping into macro photography as a hobby, I've always wanted to. I know many people here are photographers and I'm looking for their two cents on the subject. I'm wondering what it takes to get started (what I need to know before I buy anything).

  • What resources would you recommend?

    • I don't know much about photography.
    • What's what?
    • What are the do's and don'ts?
  • What kind if cameras would be best for it?
  • What lenses do I need to use?
  • What can stop me?


Though I have a very strong interest in macro photography, I'd like a camera which I may play with and use for a lot of other things, such as time-lapse photography. I'm not seriously thinking on buying anything currently, but I am interested in knowing what I would be getting myself into if/when I do.

Tao
Maniac (V) Inmate

From: The Pool Of Life
Insane since: Nov 2003

IP logged posted posted 08-24-2009 22:25 Edit Quote

Sorry for the delay zavaboy, I've only just noticed your post.
The term "macro" is much overused in photography. A lot of digital cameras both "point and shoot" and "Single Lens Reflex" have a macro setting.

SLR cameras have much the greater scope for true macro close-up, by true I mean at least a 1:1 ratio. With SLR's the lens is the true provider of macro photography, so this means you will either have to buy a special macro lens or do as I do and use close-up filters and for ultra close-up macro I use a reversing ring to physically attach the lens on to the camera body the wrong way around. There are a few examples of this style here Close-up and Macro Arthurio also has some great macro photos and techniques here too.

I haven't used a point and shoot camera so I can't really comment on them for macro.
All in all it depends upon how much you want to pay and just how macro you want to go.

Arthurio
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: cell 3736
Insane since: Jul 2003

IP logged posted posted 08-26-2009 09:15 Edit Quote

I wrote something at work and then didn't press "Submit Reply" ... silly me

You need two things: 1) lots of money 2) technical creativity.

I'll recommend 2 cheap options that are worth it:

Option A: (simple, cheapest)
1) Canon 1000D or Canon 450D (if you like Nikon then no problem it's just as good) or a used older model
2) Third party 1:1 macro lens such as Sigma 105mm f2.8 macro (fix(ed length) lenses are the way to go for macro)

Option B: (creative, flexible, bit more expensive)
1) 1000D/450D etc
2) Canon 50mm f1.8 (very cheap)
3) extension tube set + you can buy another long, nonfunctional tube for playing around...
4) reversal ring
5) optional: macro filters

In addition you'll need diffused continuous light such as daylight or you can improvise something. Don't expect to get good shots of moving targets unless you have perfect daylight or expensive macro flash. Adjusting regular flashguns for macro work takes a lot of tinkering and the results are so-so.

For time-lapse you'll need an intervalometer ... something that makes the camera take a picture every x seconds. You can also use a simple trigger in a locked position to shoot 3 fps at lower quality settings (which is preferable anyway). You can also use a usb cable + laptop for this. Also you may need a ND or (neutral density(darkening)) filter if you want to get a nice blurry effect in daylight. Also unless you want to put the camera on ground you'll need a tripod, preferably one that allows you to hang some weights such as your camera bag for stability.

For every other special use there's special equipment that you are going to want.

1) wider angle zoom lens - for taking pictures up close, I recommend something like 17-40mm
2) mid range zoom lens - 50-100mm
3) long tele(scopic) zoom lens - 100-300mm would be good - for taking pictures of more distant objects

Of course fix lenses are sharper and better but they're also more expensive

4) flash gun - for lighting up the room and not just the face of your subject (nikon has better flash system than canon)
5) tripod - for stability
6) trigger - for more stability
7) ring polarizer filters - for landscape, makes the sky more blue and reduces reflections on water, glass, cars etc

The list goes on forever...
edit: A new friend of mine (warning: big pics), fruitfly, Macro Stacking

(Edited by Arthurio on 08-26-2009 09:33)

zavaboy
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: f(x)
Insane since: Jun 2004

IP logged posted posted 08-27-2009 07:11 Edit Quote

Thank you for your replies guys! I didn't notice your reply Tao, but Arthurio bumped the thread back up to my attention again.

I'm currently tight on money and have some other higher priority costly goals which I must pursue first. But once I reach a point I can afford this, I will most likely get into it. (I wish it could be sooner; perhaps it will be sooner than I think.) I'll be back (probably asking the same kind of questions) the very moment I start seriously looking to buy photography stuff.

Thanks again for all the useful information!

hammythomas
Neurotic (0) Inmate
Newly admitted

From:
Insane since: Feb 2010

IP logged posted posted 02-26-2010 13:56 Edit Quote

Macro photography means close-up photogrphy.According to me a Canon Digital Rebel XTi with a Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro USM is best for macro photography.This lens is designed for the small-sensor Canon cameras and gives a working distance equivalent to 100mm on a full-frame camera.

larryp7639
Neurotic (0) Inmate
Newly admitted

From:
Insane since: Jul 2010

IP logged posted posted 07-13-2010 05:49 Edit Quote

Hi !
I've just visited this forum. Happy to get acquainted with you. Thanks.


__________________
Watch The Sorcererís Apprentice Online Free

(Edited by larryp7639 on 07-13-2010 05:50)

Blaise
Paranoid (IV) Inmate

From: London
Insane since: Jun 2003

IP logged posted posted 07-13-2010 10:25 Edit Quote

FYI a lot of modern mobile phones that have built in cameras have macro settings, you have to get nice and close to your subject, but they do a good enough job for practice shots. Obviously you won't be selling these images on



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